Category: Theology and Practice

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Thin Discipleship

We are experiencing a crisis in American evangelicalism. Responses to issues such as partisan politics, police brutality, or the pandemic demonstrate deep “fault lines” — as one author has recently argued. One explanation argues that these fault lines have developed...

A Conversation with Lydia Dugdale, MD: “The Lost Art of Dying”

How are we supposed to die? As a resident physician and fellow of Duke’s Theology, Medicine, & Culture Initiative, I’m convinced that this question will only become more pressing for Christians. Medicine is among the most powerful forces shaping how...

/ May 10, 2021

Water is a Single Substance

Praise the Lord from the earth, ye dragons, and all deeps (Ps. 148:7) Water is a single substance. Each and every instantiation of the liquid merges with every other. Each molecule composes the same body, longing for union with its...

/ May 7, 2021

Know Thyself: What Medieval Christians Teach Us About Humility

“Are Americans humble?” a family member asked as I explained part of my dissertation on medieval humility to him. “Um… I don’t really think so. Not generally,” I awkwardly mumbled. This answer was unsatisfactory; firstly, because I bungled it. Secondly,...

/ May 6, 2021

Review: Cajetan on Sacred Doctrine by Hieromonk Gregory Hrynkiw

Hieromonk Gregory Hrynkiw. Cajetan on Sacred Doctrine. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2020. 352 pp. $75 If your theological education was anything like mine, you learned that Tommaso de Vio, Cardinal Cajetan, was Martin Luther’s grand inquisitor....

/ May 4, 2021

Critical Theory as Method, Metanarrative, and Mood

In a recent article in First Things, “Evangelicals and Race Theory,” Carl Trueman enters into an increasingly contentious intramural debate amongst American evangelicals about the place of Critical Race Theory (and Critical Theory more broadly) in the life of the...

/ May 3, 2021

Sin for Its Own Sake? The Theft of the Pears and the Divine Image in Augustine’s Confessions

The complex recounting of the “theft of the pears” in Book 2 of his Confessions is often distilled into Augustine’s famous evaluation of the act: “I simply wanted to enjoy the theft for its own sake, and the sin” (nec...

/ March 29, 2021

Covid-19, One Year On, Pt II: The Limits of Politics

One year ago today, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the US passed 85,000, surpassing China where the virus had begun, and giving us the unenviable distinction of being #1 in the world. Today, America still holds that...

/ March 26, 2021

Becoming a Perennial: A Conversation with Grace Olmstead

In Uprooted: Recovering the Legacy of the Places We’ve Left Behind (March 2021) Grace tells the story of her hometown of Emmett, Idaho, where her great-grandfather and great-grandmother lived and farmed, and where her grandparents and parents still live. Through...

/ March 22, 2021

Marcion’s “Gift”

The church’s participation in various historical injustices is a familiar theme, one rehearsed in some instances to discredit her, but in others to prompt her to needful repentance. But the primordial sin of the church which makes other, more tangible...

/ March 19, 2021