Category: Liberal Arts

Back to the Sources: Notes on Chesterton the Historian

G.K. Chesterton wore many hats in his lifetime. His enterprises as a writer, philosopher, and theologian yielded a majority of the recognition, but we ought also consider Chesterton the historian. Chesterton—though it was not explicitly amongst his primary faculties of...

/ May 26, 2020
climate-change

The Virus and the Earth

Drawing attention during a global pandemic to the plight of air and water quality, endangered species, rising sea levels, and ecological sustainability might appear ill-timed at best, or grossly tone deaf at worst. While doctors and nurses labor under extreme...

/ May 13, 2020

The Via Media of George Herbert

In these pages, M.H. Turner and Paul Owen ably articulate and defend the Reformed and Anglo-Catholic manifestations of Anglicanism, respectively. In doing so, they reflect a tension that has existed since the English reformation. As someone standing between these two...

/ May 11, 2020

Cats and Sixty Foot Whales: Reflections on Children’s Books

The most expensive preschools in America bear a pine-scented resemblance to those senna-tinted photographs of a world before plastics, albeit with no unseemly hint of poverty. Within the world of Waldorf, Montessori and Wild Forest schools the hand dominates the...

/ May 4, 2020

Is Anglicanism a Gateway to Catholicism?: A Defense of Anglo-Catholicism

M. H. Turner’s “Why Is Anglicanism a Gateway to Catholicism?” seems to be written largely as a lament of the influence of the Oxford Movement on the ACNA. Turner calls Anglicans back to what is characterized as “Anglicanism in the...

/ May 1, 2020

Why Is Anglicanism a Gateway to Catholicism?

By M. H. Turner If you have been an Anglican in North America for more than a decade or two, there is an experience you have almost certainly had. You have known someone who got up one day and jumped...

/ April 28, 2020

Earth Day 2020: Toward a Humane Environmentalism

Earth Day has become a political Rorschach test. Whether the mention of this day summons images of pagans dancing naked around a flowery meadow or kids cleaning up plastic around the school yard depends on which way someone leans in...

/ April 22, 2020

Rise of the Scops: Wonder After the Pandemic

It was Virginia Woolf who wryly observed, “On or about December 1910, human character changed.”[1] I had no idea what this meant, until I stumbled into a fairy wood where a gilded volume by W.B. Yeats waited patiently for my...

/ April 7, 2020

On Being ‘Pro-Life’ in a Pandemic

What does it mean to be ‘pro-life’ when we’re in the midst of coronavirus and our economy is crashing as we try to contain it? The question has received some attention in recent days, in part because of our President’s...

/ March 25, 2020

Executive Orders Don’t Make Buildings Beautiful

A draft executive order has recently riled up the architectural community. Entitled “Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again,” it points out the ugliness in a number of modern architectural movements and calls for a return to classical and other traditional styles...

/ February 21, 2020