Category: Liberal Arts

Who’s Afraid of John Calvin? Answer: Thomas Jefferson

In 1822, Thomas Jefferson was enjoying a quiet retirement at his beloved Monticello. His family troubles gave him sleepless nights but he found solace in his correspondence and, as always, in his books. The former president’s mind turned over Virginia’s...

/ November 18, 2019

Happy Reformation Day, or, How Melanchthon Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Jesus

Obviously, everyone should celebrate Reformation Day. At this point, even the Church of Rome has surreptitiously attempted to take on board many of the Reformation’s emphases, albeit in impure form and without the necessary dogmatic changes—er, development[1]—that would allow her...

/ October 31, 2019

Reformation Day and the Waning of the Western Church

Reformation Day is a contested event in the church year. That this is so for Roman Christians is to be expected. That it is increasingly so for Protestants as well is lamentable. Part of the reason for that Protestant reluctance...

/ October 28, 2019

Julián Marías: Philosophy of the Person

Introduction by Joseph Minich There is a little bit of a story behind this essay that is worth telling. I discovered the writings of Julian Marias (after years of commendation by a dear friend) in writing an essay on the...

/ October 2, 2019

“Are You Alone Wise?”: Luther’s Answers for Today’s Protestants

A decade after he began advocating for reform, Martin Luther had become highly attuned to the fundamental issues at stake in the debates with his adversaries. Having made Sola Scriptura his rallying cry, he was forced to face the chaos...

/ September 3, 2019

On “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”

John Keats’s “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” is a poem about the discovery of new terrains of the imagination made possible by the translation of great works into one’s mother tongue.

/ August 13, 2019

Latin for Politics: When the World of Spoken Latin Goes Woke

Up until recently, the spoken Latin community has been preserved from the relentless focus on ideology that characterizes much of the academy. Enthusiasts have gathered at small conferences called “conventicula” (a pretty comprehensive list of events in summer 2018 can...

/ August 5, 2019
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Farmers and Humanists in an Age of Crisis: Technology, Death, and Resurrection

As a teenager at my parents’ small-town church, I heard men in business suits express relief that they made it out of the farm where they grew up. “I got out,” they would say. The implication: I moved up. I...

/ July 10, 2019

Beyond Gunpowder: A Rational Perspective on Cloning

By S. Dorman Hunting is either a discipline or a confused slaughter. Walking home this morning I thought first, not of hunting, but of my usual route along the road. I was also thinking about writing a paper on Johannes...

/ July 8, 2019

On Pro-Life Incrementalism

I heard a man say once that one’s entire response to Rod Dreher’s The Benedict Option hinged on how one thought about the sustainability of the current social order. That the existing social order is hostile to orthodoxy is obvious. But...

/ May 24, 2019