Category: Liberal Arts

Polis/Counter-polis: On the Civic Benedict Option

October 2016 was a simpler, more innocent time. We were all youths, wet behind the ears; we look back at ourselves with a kind of bemused affection. Rod Dreher assumed, surely—we all assumed—that Hillary Clinton would win in November, that...

/ April 18, 2017

How Do Movements Grow? The BenOp, Conversation, and Local Advocacy

One of my primary points in my review of Rod’s book is that orthodox Christians need a robust commitment to conversation if we are to thrive in a post-Christian context. Given the importance this will play and the related point...

/ March 30, 2017
carl-mcintire

The Religious Right Is Not a Subsidiary of the Alt-Right

In a recent essay for The New Republic, religion reporter Sarah Posner contends that the Religious Right has “effectively become a subsidiary of the alt-right, yoked to Trump’s white nationalist agenda.” By effectively wedding themselves to Trump’s narrative about ‘American...

/ March 27, 2017
hauerwas-benedict-option

Theologians Were Arguing About the Benedict Option 35 Years Ago

Getting historical perspective on a contemporary topic of debate is always helpful. Dr. Christopher Cleveland’s essay for us on the trinitarian controversy last summer is exceptional precisely because of how successfully he tied the current debate to historical debates and...

/ March 13, 2017
benedict-option

The “New Alarmism” is not new and is not alarmism.

When asked about the Holy Roman Empire the French philosophe Voltaire once quipped that said empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire. I had something like that thought while reading Dr. James K. A. Smith’s piece for the...

/ March 10, 2017
limits-of-policy

On Presidential Politics and Evangelical Cultural Clout

If you’ll indulge me, I’m going to circle back around to Emma Green’s review of Rod’s book while also linking it to Katelyn Beaty’s review of the same published earlier this week in the Washington Post.

/ March 3, 2017

Reviewing Radicalism: When Reform Becomes Revolution

In 2017, many Protestants will observe the 500th anniversary of their revolution—or at least of its most celebrated image: the promulgation of Luther’s Ninety-five Theses. Though inevitably drowned out by triumphalism, some such observances will be understandably ambivalent about the...

/ February 10, 2017
Ten-Commandments-Austin-State-Capitol

The 10 Commandments are the Foundation for Protestant Ethics

This guest post is written by Dr. Eric Hutchinson, professor of Classics at Hillsdale College. First, by way of introduction: a delightful scene from Whit Stillman’s recent movie Love and Friendship, in which Sir James Martin attempts to have an...

/ February 7, 2017
book-reviews
book-reviews

Reviewing “The End of Protestantism” by Peter Leithart

I am pleased to publish this guest review from Dr. Coyle Neal of Southwest Baptist University. Has the modern church reached the point in history where it is time to set aside the albatross of denominations and embrace a “Reformational...

/ January 18, 2017