Category: Liberal Arts

On Marianne Moore’s “Poetry”

By E. J. Hutchinson Why do we read poetry? Why should we? April is National Poetry Month, so it makes sense to take advantage of it to introduce a new series on poetry at Mere Orthodoxy. Its objective is simple:...

/ April 16, 2019

Tolkien and the Golden Age of Fantasy

By Thomas Sieberhagen For this is quite the final goal of art: to recover this world by giving it to be seen as it is. –John-Paul Sartre, What Is Literature? Blessed are the legend-makers with their rhyme of things not...

/ March 7, 2019

Neonatal Euthanasia in the New York Times?

Jen Gunter’s New York Times op-ed about the death of her twenty-two-weeks and three day old son sums up everything that is terrible and tragic about our current debate over what constitutes infanticide. On the surface, her story is just...

/ March 6, 2019

Ben Sasse Heightens the Contradictions

In a November 2018 episode of Saturday Night Live, congressman-elect Lt. Cmdr. Dan Crenshaw of Texas appeared with SNL star Pete Davidson. The much-discussed segment came one week after Davidson had made tasteless jokes about Crenshaw’s eye patch, which he...

/ March 1, 2019
book-reviews

Book Review: The Classical Revolution by John Borstlap

By Jeremiah Lawson In a time when the President has openly questioned what the United States get from being in NATO and fears that Russian and Chinese influence threaten the stability of the Atlantic American-European order, now would not seem...

/ February 12, 2019

Book Review: Music as an Art by Roger Scruton

By Jeremiah Lawson As a written practice, Western music goes back at least a thousand years. Over the centuries music has been made in the service of churches and courts, and from roughly the eighth through the thirteenth centuries was...

/ February 6, 2019

Liberalism’s Tax on the Unborn

By Miles Smith In 1781 Thomas Jefferson left the office of governor of Virginia and wrote the sole book-length work attributed to him. In Notes on the State of Virginia, Jefferson reflected on what he knew was the great moral...

/ February 5, 2019

The Latin and Reformed Imagination

By Felipe Vogel “The Reformation … was more a song or a symphony than a system, more lyric than lecture,” claims Peter Matheson in The Imaginative World of the Reformation. Yet lectures and systems are likely what comes to mind...

/ January 29, 2019
book-reviews

Book Review: Philosophy and the Christian

By Nathan L. Cartagena In high school, I rarely took classes with other Christians. This wasn’t intentional. It was the outcome of taking “advanced courses” in a school with “advanced students” who had rejected Christianity by middle school. So though I...

/ January 17, 2019

Living Local Fiction

By S. Dorman On first moving to Maine and seeing a line of tall ledges from a nearby road, I was enchanted, surprised. I’d never seen anything like them before: Mountains like waves of rock waiting to crash over the...

/ January 16, 2019