Category: Featured

The Church Has Always Known Theological Controversy

“Not again.” That was my first thought when Eugene Peterson’s comments on gay marriage came out. Regardless of the retraction, I knew the next few days would be ugly online. Various think-pieces (good and bad) would come, as would the...

/ July 21, 2017

17776 and the End of Nature

If you read Hannah Anderson’s Humble Roots a few days before reading Jon Bois’s “17776” you’ll experience a kind of whiplash. Anderson’s book is about gratitude and exploring the ways that creation teaches us about God, about ourselves, and about virtue....

/ July 19, 2017

A Christian Manifesto on Healthcare and the State

Human beings are created in the image of God, body and soul, and have been called as such “very good.” Our bodily nature reflects God’s goodness to us and the embodied acts that we participate in (eating, sleeping, work, communicating,...

/ July 18, 2017
book-reviews

Book Review: Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson

A couple weeks ago I was reviewing a draft of Kayla Snow’s excellent review of The Long, Long Life of Trees and we began talking about the historically unprecedented ignorance of place that defines many in the west today. A book like...

/ July 17, 2017

Finding the Gospel in Game of Thrones

Unless you’re living under a rock (or the proverbial bushel), it’s impossible to have missed the phenomenon that is Game of Thrones. Part fantasy epic, part prestige television, its controversial subject matter has made it a bit of a touchy...

/ July 14, 2017

Book Review: “The Boatman: Henry David Thoreau’s River Years” by Robert Thorson

I’m pleased to publish this guest review by Joshua Novalis. Every morning, on my way to work, I drive past an apartment complex amusingly named Walden Pond. While I’ve never spoken with the owners, I assume the name to be...

/ July 6, 2017

Book Review: The Long, Long Life of Trees by Fiona Stafford

I’m pleased to publish this book review by Kayla Snow. Any book written with the expressed intention of moving its readers to stop reading is one that piques my curiosity. When that book is about trees, I am especially intrigued....

/ July 3, 2017

W. E. B. Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk–Chapter 5

Chapter five is, so far, the most contemporary essay in Du Bois’s book. In it, he considers the city of Atlanta and what it says about the future of both African Americans and the South more broadly considered. He begins...

/ June 27, 2017

On Father’s Day, Living in Losses, and Home

There’s nothing that can prepare you to touch your father’s arm and find that it’s frozen. I should have known, of course. Doctors had told us what they were doing and said he’d be cold. But it’s one thing to know...

/ June 19, 2017

On Ben Sasse, Civil Society, and Voting Records

Last week Matthew Walther went hard after one of my Senators, Ben Sasse, in a piece for The Week. The piece wandered a bit, but I basically agreed with it: It’s hard to make sense of Sasse as a politician because...

/ June 15, 2017