All posts by Jake Meador

Jake Meador is a 2010 graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he studied English and History. He lives in Lincoln, NE with his wife Joie, their daughter Davy, and son Wendell. Jake's writing has appeared in Christianity Today, Fare Forward, the University Bookman, Books & Culture, First Things, Front Porch Republic, and The Run of Play.

On Trump and Repentance

As is my rule with these things, I’ve taken a few days to hold off on publishing anything on Charlottesville. That said, it’s been a couple days now and for several reasons I think it’s a good time to post...

/ August 17, 2017

Little Platoons and the Market

In his response to Andrew Strain, Joe Carter noted that one of Strain’s problems is the assumption that “some other people—rather than those directly engaged in the market activity—should decide what is best for those involved.” Well, yes—at least in...

/ August 4, 2017

Young Christians and the Specter of Socialism

Earlier this week Andrew Strain wrote a sharp, if also too short, post for First Things arguing that economic debates that orbit around whether or not the government should intervene in the marker are ultimately meaningless. This is the gist of...

/ July 27, 2017
about-mere-orthodoxy

Announcing Mere Orthodoxy’s Patreon Campaign

Mere Orthodoxy Patreon Campaign Our republic is currently embarked on an audacious experiment: We have, through a series of economic and cultural choices, destroyed many of the intermediate social structures that people rely on to shape their lives and give...

/ July 24, 2017

17776 and the End of Nature

If you read Hannah Anderson’s Humble Roots a few days before reading Jon Bois’s “17776” you’ll experience a kind of whiplash. Anderson’s book is about gratitude and exploring the ways that creation teaches us about God, about ourselves, and about virtue....

/ July 19, 2017
book-reviews

Book Review: Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson

A couple weeks ago I was reviewing a draft of Kayla Snow’s excellent review of The Long, Long Life of Trees and we began talking about the historically unprecedented ignorance of place that defines many in the west today. A book like...

/ July 17, 2017
book-reviews

Book Review: Real Artists Don’t Starve by Jeff Goins

  We live in an age of remarkably high levels of economic disruption brought about by technological developments. That’s a truism, of course, but it’s as good a starting place as any for considering the book we are discussing today....

/ July 7, 2017
book-reviews

Book Review: One by One by Gina Dalfonzo

In One by One, Gina Dalfonzo capably explains the many challenges that singles face in participating in local Christian communities and lays out some ideas on how churches can do better in this important area. (Dalfonzo rightly notes that as more...

/ June 28, 2017

W. E. B. Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk–Chapter 5

Chapter five is, so far, the most contemporary essay in Du Bois’s book. In it, he considers the city of Atlanta and what it says about the future of both African Americans and the South more broadly considered. He begins...

/ June 27, 2017

Book Review: Reclaiming Hope by Michael Wear

In Reclaiming Hope Michael Wear has written an engaging, clarifying work that nevertheless fails because it does not properly distinguish between a person’s testimony and their political theology. As such, the book often begins well before veering off into needless ambiguity...

/ June 23, 2017