Blogging has been lighter of late because I’ve been writing the book and preparing for some speaking engagements. So I thought I’d give a quick update of what I’m up to and (if you’re interested) how you can help:

1) Wheatstone Academy: I’m going to be speaking at a three-day high school retreat sponsored by Wheatstone Academy. The theme is courage. Have some ideas of what I should say? Put them in the comments below. I’m open to every and any suggestion.

2) The Mere-O Mixer, Washington D.C. Edition: If there are any readers in the DC area or who are attending the Values Voter Summit, I’m trying to set up a time to meet folks. Feel free to email me if you’re interested. And if you’re attending the Values Voter Summit in a few weeks, I’ll be there speaking about how to reach the next generation (which, I guess, is me) online.

3) Mere-O Minions: I was talking with someone about my schedule and what I wanted to do around Mere-O and they suggested that I put out a plea for minions. This is that plea. If you’re a high-schooler and want to help out a good cause, or a college student in need of an internship, let me know. There are all sorts of projects I need help managing. Preferably, the person would be someone with some tech skills or at least who is interested in learning.

4) Donate to a redesign: Just about a year ago, I decided to leave financial planning to pursue my vocation as a writer, teacher, and dilettante extraordinaire. It’s been an amazing ride since then, but I’ve found that while I enjoy writing long-form stuff, I really love Mere-O….and kind of want to keep making this a real voice in the internets. We’ve long passed the point where we need a redesign, and while I was this close to having outside funding for the project secured earlier this year, it fell through…and broke my heart in the process.

At this point, I don’t know what else to do other than put up the donate sign and ask for help. If you believe in what we’re trying to do here at Mere-O, which is raise the level of discourse and agitate for a conservative, classically informed Christian worldview, we’d really appreciate your help in trying to redesign the site. With everything we have to improve, I expect we’ll pay somewhere in the $2000 range.

Which means every dime helps.

We are so grateful for your patience and patronage. The one thing we can never do is take you, our reader, for granted. We love the sparring, even when its at its most heated, and look forward to many more dialogs long into the future.





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Posted by Matthew Lee Anderson

Matthew Lee Anderson is the Founder and Lead Writer of Mere Orthodoxy. He is the author of Earthen Vessels: Why Our Bodies Matter to our Faith and The End of Our Exploring: A Book about Questioning and the Confidence of Faith. Follow him on Twitter or on Facebook.

0 Comments

  1. On courage, talk about how the intake of beverages is not really courage. “Liquid courage” is more cowardly than courageous. And being drunk out of your mind is one of the most cowardly things a person can do when trying to engage the world.

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  2. Matthaeus Flexibilis September 2, 2010 at 2:35 pm

    How about something on Christian liberty? That’s an issue that they’ll face as they gain independence and that they’ll meet head-on and full-force if they go away to college.

    Doug Wilson had a good post (HT:JT) in which he said, “The way others are to view your liberty is not the same way that you should view your liberty. Other Christians should let you do what you want unless the Bible forbids it. That’s how we guard against legalism. But you should use your liberty differently—you should be asking what the reasons are for doing it, and not what the reasons are for prohibiting it.” (http://dougwils.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7930:why-cigarette-smoking-is-not-a-sin-for-others-just-a-sin-for-you&catid=85:dealing-with-sin)

    John Calvin also has a useful section on liberty in the Institutes (book 3, ch 19 — http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.v.xx.html), where he says, “It is, therefore, perversely interpreted by those who use it as a cloak for 2136their lusts, that they may licentiously abuse the good gifts of God, or who think there is no liberty unless it is used in the presence of men, and, accordingly, in using it pay no regard to their weak brethren. Under this head, the sins of the present age are more numerous. For there is scarcely any one whose means allow him to live sumptuously, who does not delight in feasting, and dress, and the luxurious grandeur of his house, who wishes not to surpass his neighbor in every kind of delicacy, and does not plume himself amazingly on his splendor. And all these things are defended under the pretext of Christian liberty. They say they are things indifferent: I admit it, provided they are used indifferently. But when they are too eagerly longed for, when they are proudly boasted of, when they are indulged in luxurious profusion, things which otherwise were in themselves lawful are certainly defiled by these vices” (paragraph 9).

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  3. Matthaeus Flexibilis September 2, 2010 at 2:38 pm

    PS, My post was not intended as an indirect commentary on the previous suggestion, although, on that score, Ken Gentry’s “God Gave Wine” has an excellent section on on Christian liberty vis-a-vis alcohol.

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