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Posted by Matthew Lee Anderson

Matthew Lee Anderson is the Founder and Lead Writer of Mere Orthodoxy. He is the author of Earthen Vessels: Why Our Bodies Matter to our Faith and The End of Our Exploring: A Book about Questioning and the Confidence of Faith. Follow him on Twitter or on Facebook.

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  • anselm13

    The Protestant congregations I encounter in the midwest in aggregate are often weakly sacramental. The Catholic and especially Orthodox congregations in contrast I encounter are comparatively very sacramental. Taylor doesn’t seem to be advocating for some return to the past in total. The discussion around enchantment was surprisingly simplistic and binary. It seems there is a far greater desire by many for a deep investigation/conversation between an enchanted worldview and the post-Reformation and post-Enlightenment world we’ve been bequeathed. That a 12th century farmer scatters seed rather than praying for crops to be planted by God is a silly attempt to demonstrate a more limited sense of enchantment. That I would prefer to see a doctor rather than a priest first for my kidney stone strikes me as a modern critique informed more by Mary Baker Eddy. I wonder if a medieval Catholic baker transported to the 21st Century would come to navigate their sense of enchantment by say, grasping a relic all the while availing themselves of instrumental medical technology? It seems Trueman would assert they’d: (1) abandon the faith, (2) convert to Calvinism, or (3) engage in some enchanted activity alone. No other options?