All posts by Jake Meador

Jake Meador is the editor-in-chief of Mere Orthodoxy. He is a 2010 graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he studied English and History. He lives in Lincoln, NE with his wife Joie, their daughter Davy Joy, and sons Wendell, Austin, and Ambrose. Jake's writing has appeared in Commonweal, Christianity Today, Fare Forward, the University Bookman, Books & Culture, First Things, National Review, Front Porch Republic, and The Run of Play and he has written or contributed to several books, including "In Search of the Common Good," "What Are Christians For?" (both with InterVarsity Press), "A Protestant Christendom?" (with Davenant Press), and "Telling the Stories Right" (with the Front Porch Republic Press).

The Rise of the Chicken Little Evangelical Blogger

Hebrews 11:32-38: 32 And what shall I more say? for the time would fail me to tell of Gedeon, and of Barak, and of Samson, and of Jephthae; of David also, and Samuel, and of the prophets: 33 Who through faith subdued...

/ July 30, 2013

Short-term Missions Trips and Cultural Institutions

In a recent piece for Christianity Today, Doug Banister described one of the problems with short-term mission trips: I spent many years taking mission trips to Tulcea, Romania. We shared the gospel, cared for orphans, and started a medical clinic. It...

/ July 26, 2013

Two scholars debate violence and the nation state

In the past month there has been a fascinating exchange going on between occasional Mere O contributor Brad Littlejohn and DePaul’s William Cavanaugh. It started with this critique of Cavanaugh’s work by Littlejohn: In his 2004 essay “Killing for the Telephone Company”...

/ July 18, 2013

On substitutionary atonement and disgraced politicians

In one of the great skewerings of both the Washington political establishment and modern language, George Carlin destroyed politicians–here you should think of Mark Sanford and Anthony Weiner–who are caught in a major scandal, but don’t see why that should...

/ June 7, 2013

On the roots of community

Ross Douthat recently linked the rise of suicide rates in the United States with the erosion of small communities and traditional institutions. Douthat went on to cite Rod Dreher’s recent book The Little Way of Ruthie Leming as a picture of how community can...

/ May 29, 2013

What is to be done about the evangelical industrial complex?

This essay from Carl Trueman is gold: It is probably a year or so since I raised the question of the impact of celebrity on evangelicalism. As I was told then, celebrity either does not exist in the evangelical subculture or...

/ May 3, 2013

The Ethics of Watching Mad Men

In a recent Comment piece, Jamie Smith argued that one of the foremost challenges facing Christians today is not whether or not we ought to engage popular culture–that battle has been won. The new question we have to face is...

/ April 5, 2013

A Tribute to Edith Schaeffer

If my house were burning to the ground and my family was safely outside, there’d be one book in my library I’d most hope to save from the fire: a paperback of Edith Schaeffer’s 1975 book What is a Family?...

/ April 2, 2013

House of Cards: Kevin Spacey, Tolkien, and the Bible

It’s an easy, common observation to note that you can learn about a culture by observing the heroes it creates. The culture that creates a hero like John Keating of Dead Poet’s Society is different than the one that creates...

/ February 26, 2013

A Year of Biblical Womanhood: A(nother) Review

Editor’s note:  My friend Jake Meador wrote this right around the same time I wrote my thoughts.  We don’t often post multiple entries on books, but Jake’s thoughts are worth considering and well stated. –MLA  There are two common literary...

/ November 30, 2012