Tag: Fall 2021

The Book of Revelation is for the Church

Timothy Beal. The Book of Revelation: A Biography. Lives of Great Religious Books. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. $26.95, 288 pp. First things first: Let me state my disagreement with two premises of Timothy Beal’s “biography” of the Book of...

/ November 9, 2021

The American Style in Traditionalist Parenting

Paula S. Fass. The End of American Childhood: A History of Parenting from Life on the Frontier to the Managed Child. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017. $19.95, 352 pp. Perhaps more than anything else, Paula S. Fass’s learned and engaging...

/ November 8, 2021

Boredom in a World Without Windows

James Dankert and John D. Eastwood. Out of My Skull: The Psychology of Boredom. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2020. $27.95, 282 pp. In a study where participants were instructed to sit in a room with nothing to do for only...

/ November 8, 2021

Atheist Nones and the Problem of Soviet Atheism

Victoria Smolkin. A Sacred Space is Never Empty: A History of Soviet Atheism. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. $32.95, 360 pp. It is perhaps too easily forgotten that Soviet Communism began as a vibrant ideology, full of optimism for the...

/ November 5, 2021

The Prophet of Re-Alignment: Reading Michael Lind in the Ruins of the Old Republic

It has become a tired cliché to lament the polarization of American politics, yet after a year that witnessed a post-election assault on the US Capitol, and in which even epidemiology became a partisan issue, few would contest the truth...

/ November 5, 2021

Something There Is That Doesn’t Love a Wall: Love and Citizenship

WELCOME TO UNALASKA. FREE COFFEE DONUTS. John Honan’s in the school bus next to the bridge again, its black on white on yellow greeting lit up in the fog lamps of the ramshackle cars blearily gazing through the dim mist...

/ November 4, 2021

Suffer the Little Children

It is a hard thing not to love one’s children. It is not hard to resent them, to see them as miscreants or burdens, to think them selfish and base, to find their concupiscence by turns infuriating and repugnant. Neither...

/ November 4, 2021

Our Fugitive Senses and Sensibilities

Throughout the archaeological, biological, and literary records of homo sapiens emerges a common trait: the species best capable of lifting eyes and mind heavenward has not found this earth to be enough. However murkily understood, the great mounds of earth...

/ November 3, 2021

Marriage as Moral Orthodoxy

As evangelicals watch megachurches and other institutions wobble in their convictions about marriage, we have sought to buttress support by elevating the traditional view of the doctrine to a matter of orthodoxy. Always up for a good statement — or...

/ November 3, 2021

Punishment and Exchange

It seems to some the very epitome of a “mere” orthodoxy in the worst sense — too juridical for God’s mercy and too arbitrary for God’s justice — even to those who are not in the habit of yielding too...

/ November 2, 2021