Category: Theology and Practice

The Church’s One Foundation and the Fire at Notre Dame Cathedral

By Joshua Heavin Upon initially hearing there was a fire at Cathédrale Notre-Dame, I assumed that perhaps some light smoke damage would be incurred; such a titanic vessel must be unsinkable, and our sophisticated modern technology will undoubtedly prevent any...

/ April 18, 2019

The End of Christendom: Notes on the Burning of Notre Dame

Rod Dreher is fond of quoting a line from Benedict XVI who—forgive my paraphrasing—has said that the church’s two most powerful evangelistic tools are her art and her saints. Though I have never been fully outside the church, even during...

/ April 15, 2019
washington-political-engagement

Natural Law and the Prospects of Persuasion

By James Clark When American evangelicals began to earnestly engage in conventional politics in the 1950s, a problem emerged. As David L. Weeks put it in a 2001 article, “Evangelicals have never developed a coherent and compelling political philosophy. Instead,...

/ April 15, 2019

Desire, Duty, and Dynamite

As it becomes clearer and clearer that global climate change is dangerous and will require enormous efforts to protect human lives from its effects, the debate about how our individual choices and corporate efforts affect us has only gotten sharper....

/ April 1, 2019

Pragmatism and the Practice of Theology

By Joshua Heavin Several decades ago, missiologist Lesslie Newbigin wrote about our impulse towards pragmatism in the post-Christendom West: In discussions about the contemporary mission of the Church it is often said that the Church ought to address itself to...

/ March 20, 2019

The Surprising Humanity of the Westminster Confession

Though there is no shortage of disagreement over the sources of our current malaise, that we live in a decadent society is, perhaps, one of the few ideas that actually can unite many conservative and progressive Americans. What’s more, in...

/ March 11, 2019

Will Complementarianism Die with the Baby Boomers?

In the latest edition of his newsletter “The Masculinist,” Aaron Renn dismissed complementarianism as a baby boomer phenomenon that will inevitably die with that generation. Much of the analysis is both interesting and correct, but it also misses a few key points...

/ March 5, 2019
rural-life

In Defense of Localism

By Sean O’Hare In a recent piece for Arc Digital, Nicholas Grossman examined the viability of an alliance between left-wing identity politics and right-wing localism. Grossman ultimately concludes that common ground between localism and left-wing identity politics is an impossibility...

/ February 28, 2019

What Kuyper Gets Wrong: On the Problem with Denominationalism

By Ruben Alvarado Once upon a time, the state shared the public square with the church. The central location of the church building in every European town is mute testimony to this state of affairs. But those days are long...

/ February 27, 2019
reformed-church-traumatized

The Real Place for Conflict: On Keeping Controversy Close to Home

By Justin Frank Social media gives unprecedented opportunities to know about and engage in controversy. Many of these controversies are rooted in places far from us; involve people we’ve never met (and will likely never know); and grow out of...

/ February 20, 2019