Category: Literature

Old and Relevant: Plato's Anthropological Principle

Perhaps the most famous dialogue penned by Plato is his far-reaching Republic.  In this work he addresses the popular philosophy of his day—a philosophy that was promulgated by a group of teachers known to us as Sophists.  The Sophists were...

/ February 17, 2010

Parents and Public School: Comments on Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye

I recently had the chance to read Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye for my Teach For America credentialing program at Loyola Marymount University. Reading the book in that setting prompted notice of the near absence of school in the novel....

/ October 25, 2009

C.S. Lewis was True to Himself

In 1954, C.S. Lewis was asked by the Milton Society of America to comment on his own life’s work. In his statement, Lewis insists that the explanation for such a span of genres, topics, and formats is found in the...

/ August 26, 2009

Bethlehem, by Charles Williams

‘Let us go a journey,’ Quoth my soul to my mind, ‘Past the plains of darkness Is a house to find Where for my thirsting I shall have my fill, And from my torment I shall be still.’ ‘Let us...

/ December 25, 2008

Carol, by Dorothy Sayers

The Ox said to the Ass, said he, all on a Christmas night: “Do you hear the pipe of the shepherds a-whistling over the hill? That is the angels’ music they play for their delight, ‘Glory to God in the...

/ December 24, 2008

The Nativity, by CS Lewis

Among the oxen (like an ox I’m slow) I see a glory in the stable grow Which, with the ox’s dullness might at length Give me an ox’s strength. Among the asses (stubborn I as they) I see my Saviour...

/ December 23, 2008

A Christmas Carol, by GK Chesterton

The Christ-child lay on Mary’s lap, His hair was like a light. (O weary, weary were the world, But here is all aright.) The Christ-child lay on Mary’s breast, His hair was like a star. (O stern and cunning are...

/ December 22, 2008

On Chestertonian Thomism

G.K. Chesterton is best known for his apologetic works Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. But the work that earned him some of the highest praise was Saint Thomas Aquinas: The Dumb Ox. The story of how Chesterton wrote the book...

/ November 12, 2008

Orthodoxy Turns 100

I have always thought that every academic–or wannabe, such as myself–ought have one or two hypotheses that are held very loosely, are somewhat defensible but impossible to prove, and just fringe enough to make academic parties mildly interesting. One such...

/ November 7, 2008

Douthat Defends Chesterton

Adam Gopnik’s piece about G.K. Chesterton in the New Yorker continues to stir up dissenting opinions.  The latest comes from one of my favorite contemporary conservatives, Ross Douthat, who writes: But the whole point of the “in the context of...

/ July 29, 2008