Category: Culture

A Shot Off the Mark: Reviewing Christakis’s “Apollo’s Arrow”

The most interesting part of Nicholas Christakis’ new book Apollo’s Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live is, unfortunately, its title. The book was mostly written in August 2020, published in October 2020, and...

/ March 30, 2021

Sin for Its Own Sake? The Theft of the Pears and the Divine Image in Augustine’s Confessions

The complex recounting of the “theft of the pears” in Book 2 of his Confessions is often distilled into Augustine’s famous evaluation of the act: “I simply wanted to enjoy the theft for its own sake, and the sin” (nec...

/ March 29, 2021

The Promise and the Failure of WandaVision

This article references plot points from the full run of Wandavision. Superhero films are mass-casualty events. As the Marvel Cinematic Universe has grown, it’s success has won it a little more space to consider the griefs and resentments of the...

/ March 25, 2021

To See God in the Darkness: On Tish Harrison Warren’s “Prayer in the Night”

I praise you because you are artist and scientist in one. When I am somewhat fearful of your power, your ability to work miracles with a set-square, I hear you murmuring to yourself in a notation Beethoven dreamed of but...

/ March 24, 2021

Christianity and Culture in an Age of Crisis

Christian concerns with the culture go all the way back, dating beyond the legacies of Justin Martyr and Augustine to the earliest generations of Christians. But even here, in the first centuries, negotiations with culture were not straightforward: for every...

/ March 23, 2021

Becoming a Perennial: A Conversation with Grace Olmstead

In Uprooted: Recovering the Legacy of the Places We’ve Left Behind (March 2021) Grace tells the story of her hometown of Emmett, Idaho, where her great-grandfather and great-grandmother lived and farmed, and where her grandparents and parents still live. Through...

/ March 22, 2021

Book Review: Boomers by Helen Andrews

Helen Andrews. Boomers: The Men and Women Who Promised Freedom and Delivered Disaster. New York: Sentinel, 2021. 238 pp. $27 In autumn of 1912, the British journalist Lytton Strachey declared to Virginia Woolf his opinion of the Victorians: they “seem...

/ March 17, 2021

Pam Against Posturing: On the Michael Scott Theory of Social Class

Let me preface this by claiming that beauty forms the moral imagination. Aesthetics shape our ethics, in ways both problematic and promising. How does this relate to Michael Scott? Because few of my coworkers have been transformed by encounters with...

/ March 15, 2021

When Time Isn’t Time: Augustine on Tenet

The greatest living movie maker (Christopher Nolan), director of the greatest movie ever (The Prestige – we will have to discuss it another time), has done it again, though you would not know it if you relied on the popular...

/ March 10, 2021

Book Review: Reading While Black by Esau McCaulley

“It is precisely because the Christian faith is the recognition of a work of God—a work that began in the dawn of time and continues in this era—that its essence is a fruit of the ages, while its form is...

/ March 9, 2021