Category: Film Reviews/Hollywood

The Danger of Respectable Christianity

Since its first season premiered on Netflix in 2016, The Crown has garnered attention from viewers, critics, and from the members of the royal family whose lives it portrays. The series’ fourth season, which was released late last year, has...

/ April 5, 2021

I Am a Unit of One

After Jiang Qing married Mao Zedong in 1938, Communist leadership informed her that to join the Communist movement, she would need to submit her will to a work unit. Qing, who before her marriage to Mao was an aspiring actress,...

/ March 31, 2021

The Promise and the Failure of WandaVision

This article references plot points from the full run of Wandavision. Superhero films are mass-casualty events. As the Marvel Cinematic Universe has grown, it’s success has won it a little more space to consider the griefs and resentments of the...

/ March 25, 2021

When Time Isn’t Time: Augustine on Tenet

The greatest living movie maker (Christopher Nolan), director of the greatest movie ever (The Prestige – we will have to discuss it another time), has done it again, though you would not know it if you relied on the popular...

/ March 10, 2021

Kafka in Heaven: “Soul” and the After Life as Bureaucracy

Once seen as over-reliant on sequels and prequels, Pixar seem to have hit their stride of originality again. Following last year’s Onward, Soul has been hailed as a return to form. The film’s worldbuilding, however, is not especially original. It...

/ February 11, 2021

Faith Lost and Found in “Ad Astra”

In his 2006 Wired essay, “The Church of the Non-Believers,” journalist Gary Wolf coined the term “New Atheists” to describe the intellectual movement inaugurated by a quartet of thinkers who pressed for a militant revival of Neo-Darwinism in the wake...

/ February 9, 2021

Time is Always Time: Christopher Nolan, T. S. Eliot, and Creatureliness

As one of very few directors billed above his stars, Christopher Nolan was almost in with a shout at reviving post-lockdown cinema. As it turned out, the late August release of Tenet was the last gasp off an overly-optimistic pandemic...

/ December 8, 2020

Lady Bird and the Buffered Self

“Do I look like I’m from Sacramento?” “You are from Sacramento.” Greta Gerwig’s 2018 film Lady Bird explores the relationship between identity, freedom, and givenness with painstaking attention to mundane details. An homage to her hometown of Sacramento, California, the...

/ November 30, 2020

The (Latest) Modern Prometheus: Intergenerational Breakdown in The Lighthouse

“The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders...

/ March 2, 2020

A Hidden Life According to Neil Postman

What is it that makes Terrence Malick’s A Hidden Life so starkly unique and beautifully profound? To answer this question, let’s start by considering literature. Great literature attempts to encapsulate the beauty and hardship of life and its relation to...

/ February 3, 2020